Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 6 Health care coverage/access in Latin American countries (%)

From: The rise of noncommunicable diseases in Latin America and the Caribbean: challenges for public health policies

  1. Source: Mesa-Lago (2008)
  2. n.a. non-available
  3. aIn some countries, armed forces, policemen, civil servants, and other separate schemes
  4. bSalaried employers, large and small enterprises, domestic servants, and other separate schemes
  5. cOf the 53.3 % affiliated, 29 % were in the contributory regime and 24.3 % in the subsidized regime. The remaining 46.7 % are either connected (vinculados) to public hospitals, but the total is questionable due to duplication in coverage and unknown actual access of vinculados is unknown
  6. dPublic responsible for all without social insurance; a small fraction covered by private; total assumes law enforcement but 20% may lack access.
  7. eLack of reliable data on public, private, and others impeded an estimation of total
  1. Source: Mesa-Lago (2008)
  2. n.a. non-available
  3. aIn some countries, armed forces, policemen, civil servants, and other separate schemes
  4. bSalaried employers, large and small enterprises, domestic servants, and other separate schemes
  5. cOf the 53.3 % affiliated, 29 % were in the contributory regime and 24.3 % in the subsidized regime. The remaining 46.7 % are either connected (vinculados) to public hospitals, but the total is questionable due to duplication in coverage and unknown actual access of vinculados is unknown
  6. dPublic responsible for all without social insurance; a small fraction covered by private; total assumes law enforcement but 20% may lack access.
  7. eLack of reliable data on public, private, and others impeded an estimation of total